The X Factor of Successful Startups: Love

Starting up any new venture can be one of the greatest challenges any business person could face. Even experienced and talented experts or business people that have thrived in some of the most challenging corporate environments can find themselves discombobulated when faced by the pressure and interdependence both financially and through accountability of an entrepreneurial venture.

That being said, there is definitely a unique personality and disposition or character required to endure and especially thrive in the entrepreneurial adventure. In particular I enjoy how Sarah Prevette, CEO and Founder of Sprouter, defines the fine balance of entrepreneurial characteristics. She defines the key characteristics of the entrepreneur as a balance of gumption and structured narcissism. These definitions definitely toe a thin line and leads us to think, can a business owner be too entrepreneurial to a fault?

Sarah defines the culture of the entrepreneur as combination of “A tempered vanity; a desire to be seen as the best, but primarily to one’s self” and “An unwavering belief in personal capability and the assertiveness to flaunt it”.

These characteristics are aligned with the tough traits required to meet the description of the role associated with significant risk and initiative. However, excessive pervasiveness of the entrepreneurial traits can be a roadblock to true success on a new startup. If the most prominent motivation to become an entrepreneur is mislead by vanity and self sufficient showmanship. As a business owner it is important to evaluate that priorities stem from a passion for the business and not besuperseded by a need for independence and or self indulgent vanity.

Some entrepreneurs liken the experience of starting a business to raising a child. Building a startup takes an investment beyond just the 9 to 5 and requires a high level of unwavering dedication. To build a sustainable successful business, the business owners need to have absolute passion for their business and not just a desire to be their own boss.

Love and passion for the business is what makes the difference between successful startup artists and people that buy themselves a job.

Would you agree?

Photo credit Zak VTA

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6 responses to “The X Factor of Successful Startups: Love

  1. Well said Daniel and agreed – love and passion. @sarahprevette does a great job too.

  2. If the main point is that love and passion for business results in success, I'm not sure I can agree. But then again, you don't really define love, passion or success – so I can't say either way. It would also be helpful to see what you mean when you say, “buy yourself a job,” because that seems like it could be an interesting idea if it was expanded and contextualized.I know plenty of people who are passionate and love what they do. Great.That doesn't guarantee they're good at what they do, or that they have what it takes to “succeed.” But then again, if we define success as “loving what you do passionately,” then I know a lot of people that fit the bill – inside and out of the entrepreneurial world.

    • The main point of the blog post was that “excessive pervasiveness of the entrepreneurial traits can be a roadblock to true success on a new startup”.What I was trying to convey was an observation of entrepreneurs that are driven to starting a business out of a desire for independence and or as a consequence of the pervasiveness excess of the entrepreneurial personality Sarah described.I think we are on the same page and I would group – love, passion & actually being good in the same bucket here.My point is that a entrepreneur could lead themselves to 'buy themselves a job' if the decision is a result of the excessive personality traits of the entrepreneur rather than a) a dedication and belief in the sustainability and potential of the business opportunity b) their capability, skill passion and love for their craft.I hope that clarifies things more concisely.

  3. Good article! When one is passionate about one's job, it comes through in one's work product.Malcolm P. MacPhersonvancouverbusinesslaw.ca

  4. The irony is that the burning desire for proprietorship, not being intimidated by reactionary critics and nay sayers, as well as thinking without regard for the box, or the box's gate keepers; and above all convincing clients, suppliers and service providers of your total, 24/7, commitment, and sincerity to them and to your idea — the ingredients which can secure your success; are the exact same ones which will get you fired as an employee. When you succeed, you will be deemed 'lucky'. It's just like Kipling said over 100 years ago, 'If you can meet with triumph and disaster, and treat these two imposters just the same'….

  5. The irony is that the burning desire for proprietorship, not being intimidated by reactionary critics and nay sayers, as well as thinking without regard for the box, or the box's gate keepers; and above all convincing clients, suppliers and service providers of your total, 24/7, commitment, and sincerity to them and to your idea — the ingredients which can secure your success; are the exact same ones which will get you fired as an employee. When you succeed, you will be deemed 'lucky'. It's just like Kipling said over 100 years ago, 'If you can meet with triumph and disaster, and treat these two imposters just the same'….

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